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History

With its rich history of service to the community and its proven training, Junior League of Chattanooga (JLC) continues to make a lasting impact by investing time, talents and finances in programs and projects to improve the quality of life for thousands of residents around the greater Chattanooga area.

JLC believes that an emotionally, physically, spiritually and mentally healthy child is the product of a supportive, well-balanced family structure. Through collaborations with other individuals, agencies and organizations that share our values, JLC’s community impact is greater than any member could make on her own.

Watch the video below to learn more about the history of the Association of Junior Leagues International.

2000-2006 – INVEST IN CHILDREN, SUCCESS BY 6
The League provided volunteer support by developing literacy and theme packs for books at neighborhood reading centers and Books for Babes.

2002-2007 – FAMILY VIOLENCE SHELTER
The League provided financial and volunteer support to annually refurbished resident rooms, organized special events, monthly birthday parties for children in the shelter, helped implement an annual conference to increase awareness of domestic violence, and monitored court cases relating to domestic violence.

2002-2006 – NEIGHBORHOOD READING CENTERS
The League provided financial and volunteer support to neighborhood reading centers by preparing the rooms that will be used as reading centers throughout the year. A total of six community reading rooms were opened by the League plus one reading room housed within the Family Violence Shelter.

2004-2007 – GIRL’S ZONE- GIRLS, INC. OF CHATTANOOGA
The League provided financial to expand the Girls, Inc. service area outside of the inner city of Chattanooga. Programs are designed specifically for each neighborhood’s needs and aim to forward a girl’s capacity for personal achievement.

2004-2006 – WTCI READY TO LEARN
The partnership with WTCI-TV looked to expand their Ready to Learn outreach services. Volunteers facilitate and serve as resource personnel for workshops designed to build literacy skills and enhance social growth. A reading room at WTCI-TV was also named in honor of the Junior League of Chattanooga.

2005-Present – GENERAL FUND COMMUNITY GRANTS
The League began offering small grants to area non-profit agencies. Grants cannot exceed $2,500.  All League funding, each request must include a volunteer component.

2007-2012 – HEALTHY STARTS: BABY BASICS
The League partners with RE:START Chattanooga for Baby Basics, a prenatal health literacy program created by The What to Expect Foundation in New York that serves to help low income expecting mothers learn how to care and advocate for themselves and their unborn babies. League volunteers serve in a mentorship program as “Pregnancy Pals” and meet with expecting moms, providing education and assistance in understanding of how to access, understand and act upon health information and provide baby showers for graduating moms each year.

2007-2010 – HEALTHY START: EAT WELL
The Eat Well program partnered with the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department on the JLC/Step ONE Eat Smart initiative, which addresses obesity among children from K-5th grades with a three-fold focus on homes (families), schools and dining establishments. The League addresses nutrition education among families through contributions for Garden Grants. In 2008, nine area applicants received free education from the Tennessee Department of Agriculture’s Master Gardening Program and funding for garden supplies. Each community garden is sustained by the respective members of the winning organization, and teaches parents and children the importance of growing and consuming fruits and vegetables. The League distributes prizes to Hamilton County elementary schools rewarding monthly winners for correct responses to interactive bulletin boards located in each cafeteria. Each bulletin board promotes a nutrition education program that was started in 2006, which promotes the identification and consumption of fruits and vegetables to students. The League also created demand for healthier restaurant menu selections by providing real benefits to restaurants that share concern for the health of the community.

2007-2011 – HEALTHY STARTS: CARE MOBILE
The League is partnering with the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Greater Chattanooga/T.C. Thompson Children’s Hospital provides children with healthy starting points for nutrition and fitness at Hamilton County elementary schools and other community sites through the Ronald McDonald Care Mobile. League volunteers help facilitate the SmartMoovz program, which teaches good nutrition choices during a low-impact aerobic exercise class. Through 2010, children received dental treatment from The Care Mobile, which provides full-service dental treatment for children with TennCare or without dental insurance.

2007-Present – KIDS IN THE KITCHEN
Beginning in 2007, the League joined with Junior Leagues from across four countries in an international initiative called Junior Leagues’ Kids in the Kitchen, designed to help communities address the urgent issues surrounding childhood obesity and poor nutrition. During National Nutrition Month (March), the League hosts a local educational event in order to raise awareness and provide solutions for the growing health problems associated with childhood obesity.

2009-2012 – MCR FOUNDATION
The League ended the former Eating Disorder Awareness puppet shows targeting elementary aged school children, and combined efforts with the MCR Foundation in 2008 to promote positive body image and self esteem in the fight against eating disorders. The MCR Foundation will combine with the League to teach elementary (grades 3 to 5) about the Ladybug Program, an educational plan that includes a storybook and gardening activity used to promote a healthy lifestyle and appropriate self-image.

2011 – Winner: WTCI Be More Award “People’s Choice Award
2011 – Winner: Chamber of Commerce, Non-Profit of the Year Award
2011 – Chattanooga Mayor’s Office, Seasoned to Taste, Official Cookbook of Chattanooga
2012 – Winner: Favorite Recipes Press Cookbook of the Year Award, Seasoned to Taste

2012-2017– SEEDS OF CHANGE
Seeds of Change is JLC’s new collaborative effort to eliminate food deserts in Hamilton County. Food deserts are defined as areas where most residents have low or no access to fresh, healthy, affordable food, and they are a problem that affects more than 60,000 Hamilton County residents.  Through a partnership with the Chattanooga Area Food Bank, the YMCA of Greater Chattanooga, and other members of the Hamilton County Food Coalition, JLC will address the issue of food deserts in Hamilton County through advocacy, educational outreach, and the skills, efforts, and enthusiasm of its trained volunteers.

2017-2020- A LEAGUE OF LEARNERS                                                            The initiative focuses on fostering lifelong learners in the Chattanooga community. The Junior League of Chattanooga has long supported education in Hamilton County with our Mini-Grants for Hamilton County Public School Teachers program since 1988.

Our 2020 partnerships will provide an active volunteer base to help develop learners into leaders in our community. In 2017-18 school year, the Junior League of Chattanooga collaborated with East Lake Elementary School as a community impact partner. JLC worked with East Lake Elementary faculty, staff and parents on numerous projects including workdays, mobile food pantries, reading programs and special events. Annually we choose a new school to support outside of Mini Grants as in Orchard Knob Elementary, Hardy Elementary.

Additional projects serving our community include:

  • Sponsored the New Teacher Academy breakfast.
  • Volunteered at the food pantry at East Lake Elementary.
  • Volunteered and provided treats at East Lake Elementary Fall Festival sponsored by JLC Kids in the Kitchen Committee.
  • Collected books to donate to the Opportunity Zone school libraries and Read 20.
  • Adopt-a-Teacher Welcome Reception hosted 44 of Hamilton County’s newest teachers at Orchard Knob Elementary School. JLC’s League of Learner’s Team  provided treats, drinks, and goody bags supporting new teachers to help them start their first year off right!

Community Engagement 2021-2022

Sponsored and facilitated Fall and Spring Reading Events at Montessori Elementary at Highland Park (MEHP).

Host monthly Kids in the Kitchen after school club meetings for 5th graders at MEHP.

Held a Polar Express pajama drive for all MEHP students, donating over 200 pairs of pajamas.

Organized a teacher appreciation breakfast at our Polar Express PJ delivery.

Collected new and slightly used clothes, purses, accessories, etc. to begin a donation-based “GLAM Closet” at Chattanooga Girls Leadership Academy (CGLA).

Collected and donated new school supplies and classroom materials to stock the Hamilton County Teacher Supply Store.

Provided self-care kits and education to the young women of Girls Inc. at their annual Back to School Bash

Provided helping hands at a fundraiser for local, non-profit, Hope Included, as they seek to raise funds to build an inclusive community playground

Served as “virtual” guest readers for East Lake Elementary School’s “Read Across America” Week 

With monetary support from a local sponsor, JLC provided over $17,000 in “Mini Grants” money to local Hamilton County School classrooms and teachers to support new and innovative ways of promoting literacy and learning in the classroom.

We helped build, secure sponsorships and stock 6 Little Free Libraries located at these locations. Ongoing donations of books are collected from READ 20 and JLC members to restock these Little Libraries locations.

      • Bridge City Community Church | 3300 Brannon Avenue, Chattanooga

      • East Side Elementary | 1603 S. Lyerly Street, Chattanooga

      • Heritage Park | 1428 Jenkins Road, Chattanooga

      • John A Patten Recreation Center | 3202 Kellys Ferry Road, Chattanooga

      • Junior League of Chattanooga | 622 E. 4th Street, Chattanooga

      • Montessori Elementary | Highland Park, Chattanooga

1990-1991 – ADOLESCENT SUICIDE PREVENTION PROGRAM

The ASPP was designed to reduce the risk of adolescent suicide among teenagers in the Chattanooga area, and reached approximately 6,000 students in Hamilton County public and private high schools. Volunteers presented an informative film on suicide with a discussion.

1990-1991 – RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE COURTYARD

The League provided volunteers to design the courtyard area, purchase plants and created a maintenance schedule enlisting support from area Garden Clubs.

1991-1993 – TENNESSEE AQUARIUM

The League provided $100,000 for three years to fund the Aquarium’s Discovery Falls Gallery.

1991-1992 – CHATTANOOGA CARES (Council on AIDS Resources, Education and Support)

The League provided financial and volunteer support through preventive education concerning AIDS to the metro Chattanooga area. The League funded a Volunteer Coordinator, staffed the AIDS Information Hotline and worked the “Buddy” system with the families or patients with AIDS.

1991-1992 – CHATTANOOGA ROOM IN THE INN

The League provided financial and volunteer support for a Volunteer Coordinator. Volunteers served on an Advisory Committee and assisted day or night programs and community activities.

1992-1993 – HAND IN HAND

The League provided volunteer and financial support by reading stories, listening to the student read, playing educational games, reinforcing basic skills, and sharing interests, experiences and hobbies. The objective was to build self-esteem, develop and foster a one-on-one relationship and enhance basic skills. Funding was used to expand the program into additional schools.

1992-1993 – THERAPY FOR CHILDREN OF FAMILIES WITH ADDICTION

The League provided volunteer support to mentor children during six months of therapy. Therapy groups consisted of children 7 through 12 years old, addressed problems created by a family member’s addiction to drugs and alcohol.

1995-2000 – CHILDCARE RESOURCE CENTER

The League provided volunteer and financial support for the first area-wide Childcare Resource Center. The Center serves as a clearing house of information for day care providers. Funds were used for the yearly director’s salary. This model program was duplicated throughout the state.

1994-2003 – WESTSIDE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

This program was the League’s first major all-encompassing venture to aid in transforming a historic inner-city neighborhood. The League committed $400,000 over three years to the capital fund in support of Westside. Projects includes refurbishing the James A. Henry School building to house a Medical Home, meeting rooms, job training, a Family Resource Center, a youth program, and an institutional kitchen. This tremendous collaborative work was recognized by the Association of Junior Leagues International in 1996 when the Junior League of Chattanooga, Inc. received the coveted BMW Award.

1996-1997 – FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER:

League volunteers worked one-on-one with Westside residents to prepare them to take the GED.

1996-1999 – DENTAL CLINIC:

Along with the Dental Alliance, the League funded a dentist to provide care for residents at Westside and a sealant program for resident children and helped to promote dental education.

1996-1999 – NEWTON DAY CARE CENTER:

Volunteers read to resident children, organized monthly birthday parties, and, working with a UTC intern, provided music education.

1997-2000 – COMMUNITY GARDEN:

The League helped establish an Urban Community Garden in the community. A gift was made in memory of Hazel Hutcheson Meadow.

1997-2000 – TENNIS PROGRAM:

Volunteers taught tennis to the children.

1998-2000 – COMMUNITY PLAYGROUND:

Along with corporate sponsor Brach and Brock, the League worked with residents to establish multi-level age appropriate playground equipment. The playground was also used by the Siskin Preschool housed at the Westside.

1998-2000 – URBAN LEAGUE

The League joined together to assist the Urban League’s work in job training and placement for individuals desiring to enter the work force. The program helped develop the job skills and etiquette needed for productive workers.

1998-2004 – T.C. THOMPSON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

The League provided financial support to renovate and update the Children’s Emergency Room facility. The partnership also included volunteers to enhance patient advocacy and a citywide collaboration with the public school system to educate primary age students on self-esteem.

1999-2002 – PARTNERSHIP FOR CHILDREN

The League provided volunteer support for tutoring elementary age students at the Northside Neighborhood House and the After-School Care program. The Partnership for Children was a collaborative venture with existing community resources to create a strong, cohesive vision for children.

1999- 2002 – RONALD McDONALD HOUSE

Ronald McDonald House is a home-away-from-home for families of seriously ill children. Volunteers worked within the T.C. Thompson Family Room and the Adopt-A-Meal program.

1952-1971 – PUPPETEERS

The League started producing puppet shows in 1952, which played to thousands of children and continued to be used in the Eating Disorders Awareness Programs.

1952-1971 – CHILDREN’S COMMUNITY THEATER

Talented League volunteers produced and acted in “live” plays. Professional touring companies were also brought to the area. The League also produced radio programs for the cultural enrichment of Chattanooga’s children. Continuing from 1952 through 1971 trooping puppeteers presented the Lollipop Theater to thousands of area children.

1958 – FINER FILMS SERIES

The League brought several fine films to Park Theater in summertime to improve children’s movie fare. Proceeds from ticket sales went to redecorate at Children’s Hospital in 1958.

1958-76 – ALLIED ARTS

The League was instrumental in organizing the Allied Arts Council through the inception of their incorporation as a non-profit organization. League members promoted and participated in Allied Arts and fine Arts Festivals.

1959 – BUSY BOOKS

The League printed some 4,000 booklets annually of “things-to-do” for children ages 5-12 for the Children’s Hospital, Little Miss Mag and some 16 other child-care institutions.

1959-1977 – SALVATION ARMY

The League supplied 1,000 books for East Chattanooga Citadel in 1959-60. Volunteers filled Christmas bags with food for the needy and rang bells in the Christmas street campaign.

1959-1964 – TALENTED YOUTH

The Talented Youth Project provided counseling, testing and enrichment for talented youth in Chattanooga area. The League provided financial support to the University of Chattanooga for the operation of the project throughout this period.

1960 – HANDICAPPED CONFERENCE

Jointly sponsored with the Nemours Foundation, the fourth Tennessee Conference on Handicapped and Gifted Children in the spring of 1960 was supported by funds from the League.

1961-1969 – YOUTH ARTS FAIR

The League, in cooperation with the University of Chattanooga, sponsored the first Youth Arts Fair in Chattanooga to recognize Junior and Senior High School students for excellent work in the fields of the Humanities and Social Sciences.

1963, 1974-1982 – GIRLS’ CLUB OF CHATTANOOGA

The League provided financial support to the Girls’ Club for its work with young girls in Highland Park area. The League has had several members serve on the Girls’ Club board over the years. From 1974-1980 – The League purchased and equipped a van, which is professionally staffed to operate programs in five or more locations throughout Chattanooga on a regular basis. Volunteers served as program aides, observers, evaluators and surveyors. In 1980, the League provided financial support to implement a “growth through arts” program.

1963 – OPPORTUNITY HOME FOR GIRLS (LOUISE CURREY HOME)

The League provided financial support for the first year’s operation of this home which houses from 6 to 12 girls over the age of 16 without parents, home or guardian to rear them in a proper home atmosphere. Volunteers counseled, sewed for them and served on the Home’s Board.

1963 – SCHOLARSHIP FUND FOR TEACHERS OF THE PERCEPTUALLY HANDICAPPED CHILDREN

The League provided financial support to help in sending a teacher for special training in handling perceptually handicapped children.

1963-1964 – SENIOR NEIGHBORS, INC.

The League provided financial support to the “Hot Lunch” program for senior citizens and for kitchen expansion at the center.

1964-1973 – OAK GROVE TRAINING SCHOOL FOR THE PROFOUNDLY RETARDED

The League provided financial support to the continuation and further explorations of the Developmental Training Classes for the Profoundly Retarded of Orange Grove School. Support was also provided to publish a booklet about the Cottage and was distributed to Junior Leagues, special educational schools and special education departments in colleges and universities throughout the country. Volunteers worked in the classroom, kept records, refurbished the Cottage and kept the public informed. In addition, the League provided support for the furnishing and equipping of the new Orange Grove complex. The League received awards from Chattanooga Council for Retarded Children and from the Tennessee Association for Retarded Children and Adults, Inc.

1967 – YMCA

The League provided financial support to the YMCA to help with their education program.

1969-1972 – MUSIC EDUCATION PROJECT

The League provided financial support to over three years to co-sponsor six concerts annually in selected junior and senior high schools with the Chattanooga Symphony Association. As a result of this project, the Little Orchestra was formed by the Symphony. In 1972 the program was taken over by the Chattanooga Symphony Association.

1970-1971 – TUTORIAL WORKSHOP

The League provided financial support to the Junior League UTC Tutoring Program. A questionnaire was drawn up and sent out to sixteen agencies and many of the local churches. The instruction focused on four major areas: mathematics, reading, language arts and psycho-social adjustment. The aims in each area were to give instruction in techniques for diagnosing disabilities, responding to this information and evaluating pupil progress.

1970-1972 – VOLUNTEERS’ BUREAU

The Volunteers’ Bureau was established in January 1970, as a two-year demonstration project cosponsored by the Junior League and the Metropolitan Council for Community Services. The League provided financial support to involve volunteers in the areas of health, welfare, recreation, education and the arts.

1971 – RECREATIONAL PARK

The League provided financial support to develop a recreational park.

1971-73 – DRUG PROJECT

The League provided financial support and brochures to the Methadone Clinic. The film “Drugs Are Like That” was also purchased along with projection for elementary school children. Also, the League helped to equip a kitchen-dining area for use by the resident clients and staff of Recovery House. League volunteers were also placed to help with operation of program.

1974 – THE CHATTANOOGA RAPE PREVENTION CRISIS CENTER

The Chattanooga Rape Prevention and Crisis Center provided counseling services, the lending of emotional support to rape victims and their families and field work in self-defense. The League provided financial support to purchase call-switching equipment and printing and educational materials.

1974-1975 – THE YOUTH RESIDENTIAL CENTER

The Youth Residential Center provided an intensive treatment program for dependent, neglected and pre-delinquent boys between the ages of 13 and 17. The League provided financial support and volunteers to prepare and present a slide program to the community and to function as supporting staff workers.

1974-1980, 1984-1985, 1990-1992- THE VOLUNTEER COMMUNITY SCHOOL

The Volunteer Community School, a pre-school for disadvantaged children ages 2 through 6, places special emphasis on language development and pre-reading skills. Volunteers were trained to help as aides in all classes, working directly with children to provide an art program and language development. The League provided financial support for salaries and purchase of instructive materials. In 1984-1985 the League provided financial and volunteer support to the School with newly developed DISTAR materials and provided advanced training for teachers. In 1990-1992 the League provided volunteer and financial support to update and purchase reading and math materials. Volunteers selected materials, and helped teachers with the orientation as well as volunteered as aides. The League furnished a classroom at their new location in North Chattanooga.

1975 – 2002 T.C. THOMPSON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

The League provided financial support and volunteers to implement the play therapy program, the therapist’s salary and to help furnish the new playrooms.

1976 – COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY SERVICES

The League joined with the other four Tennessee Leagues to fund the salary of a state-wide CES coordinator for two years.

1976-1978 – UNITED CEREBRAL PALSY

The League provided financial support to for an infant development program.

1977 – BLOOD ASSURANCE, INC.

The League provided financial support to purchase a six-donor station mobile set to be taken into locations such as office buildings or industries to draw blood.

1977-1978 – MOCCASIN BEND PSYCHIATRIC HOSPITAL

Patients from the Winston Building of Moccasin Bend Psychiatric Hospital were able to spend their behavior modification tokens at the Bargain Mart in the amount of $209 per patient monthly. A total of $2,500 in merchandise was bought during a one-year period.

1977-1981 CHATTANOOGA NATURE CENTER

The League provided financial for a director for the first year and the leadership support to create a Nature Center for the community. Volunteers assisted with class guides, natural resources, collectors and fundraisers. A salary was also provided for the Chief Naturalist.

1979-1980, 1985-1986 – SCENIC LAND SCHOOL

The Scenic Land School for learning disabled children was provided various sums and volunteer assistance for creative classroom work, as well as scholarship assistance. In 1985-1986, volunteers offered eight extra-curricular courses with topics in the areas of art, music, dance and logic games

1981-1982 – FAMILY AND CHILDREN’S SERVICES

The League provided financial support to the salary of a Volunteer Coordinator.

1981-1982 – DRUG AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE FORUM

A Drug and Substance Abuse Forum, planned jointly with the Adult Education Council in 1982.

1982-1989 – VERY SPECIAL ARTS FESTIVAL

The League co-sponsored with the Kiwanis Club with a grant from the National Committee provided Arts for the Handicapped; VSAF served over 1,000 regional handicapped youths at the first annual festival. The festival provided opportunities to participate in music, dance, drama and creative visual arts. The League provided financial and volunteer support to conduct in-service workshops for artists and educators in conjunction with the Festival and to provide year-round and ongoing arts programs and experiences to enrich classroom curriculum.

1982 and 1988 – KALEIDOSCOPE

The League provided volunteer support to Kaleidoscope; an art workshop for children ages 6 to 12 presented and funded by Hallmark Cards, Inc. The exhibit required over 200 volunteers during its 10-day visit and served over 2,500 children.

1983-1984 – CHEMICAL PEOPLE

The Chemical People began as a series of two national PBS-TV programs shown to groups of concerned citizens in an effort to educate them on the problem of substance abuse. Some 3,824 citizens participated in 27 town meetings that were held throughout the Chattanooga area.

1983-1987 – “SKILLS FOR LIVING”

The League sponsored a lecture by Rick Little, Chairman of the National Drug Abuse Task Force and the Executive Director of the Quest Foundation focusing on his “Skills for Living” program. High schools integrated this program into their curriculum with funding from the League and other area foundations, corporations and individuals.

1983-Present – COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD

The League is committed to recognizing outstanding voluntary service in our community in order to support and encourage those who give of their time and energies toward the betterment of our city. Each year, the League presents the Community Service Award to a volunteer who supports Chattanooga tirelessly, and significantly.

1984-1988 – “I’M SPECIAL”

“I’m Special” was a program of activities to instill in children that they are special in their own unique way. Eight sessions were designed to increase students’ self-esteem and sense of identity, to develop decision making and communication skills, and promote a better understanding of feelings.

1984-1985 – SCULPTURE: EXPLORING THREE DIMENSIONS

An estimated 4,000 people took part in this League sponsored art project at the Hunter Museum, designed to help children understand the world of sculpture. 55 schools and other groups participated in the “hands-on” workshops and tours given during the 6-week exhibition.

1985-1988 – HAMILTON COUNTY JUVENILE COURT

The League provided a volunteer advocate support to CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate). The trained volunteer included an investigator, advocate, facilitator, monitor, and/or reporter on behalf of a child.

1985-1987 – FAMILY AND CHILDREN SERVICES OF CHATTANOOGA, INC.

The League trained volunteers in all areas of crisis intervention with respect to victims of family violence. Volunteers helped run the newly established Family Violence Hotline.

1986-1987 – SENIOR DEVELOPMENT CENTER AND YMCA

The program provided assistance and services to help older persons remain independent and functional at home as long as possible.

1987-1988 – READ FOR SUCCESS

“Read for Success” provided high interest reading materials and volunteers to be used in a pilot project to make adult reading classes more attractive and practical.

1987-1988 – IN-LEAGUE WITH EDUCATION

“In-League with Education” provided an opportunity for all Hamilton County secondary school teachers to apply for grants for special classroom projects or school-wide enrichment programs.

1988-Present – MINI-GRANTS FOR TEACHERS

Since 1988, the League has given varying grants up to $750 to Hamilton County K-12 educators to enable them to express their creativity and visions through special classroom projects or school-wide enrichment programs.

1988-1990 – FORTWOOD CENTER NURSERY

The League provided financial and volunteers for pre-school children who have been abused or neglected. Funds helped purchase audio materials to educate Fortwood pre-school children in the area of self-protection from abuse and in the area of general development.

1989-1991 and 2004-2005- HANDS ON WITH HABITAT

The League provided volunteer and financial support to Habitat for Humanity, which seeks to eliminate poverty housing by helping chosen families build their own affordable homes. The “Junior League House”, completed in 2005, was the 10th “Women Build” project in Chattanooga.

1989-1990 – SIGNAL CENTERS

The League provided volunteer and financial support to create a “library” of toys which are developmentally appropriate and designed for physically and mentally disabled children.

1907-1926 – Mrs. Deaderick Moon, the first president, and Mrs. C.C. Nottingham investigated, planned, arranged, and finally introduced us into the Association of Junior Leagues in 1917. Early years were mainly filled with efforts to raise money for the various charitable institutions of Chattanooga always in need of funds. The League did all that it could to help fill these needs. Balls were given, follies produced, and sacrifice sales were held. With these money-raising feats came new opportunities for volunteer service, and we became sought after as concerned and informed helpers. There are many institutions and projects to which we have supplied volunteers and board members. Following is a list of some of those to which we have given our support in money and volunteer service in the years since 1926.

1917-1979 – JUNIOR LEAGUE FOLLIES

The Junior League of Chattanooga put on Follies through the years intended to “raise money for the Community Trust Fund and to have a unifying cause.” In 1967, our Fiftieth Anniversary year was marked by continuous newssheet coverage. A “Golden Follies” was held at the Tivoli Center.

1926-1928 – HAMILTON COUNTY SCHOOLS

The Junior League of Chattanooga provided a salary from 1926-29 for a trained nutritionist who taught the first nutrition course ever given in Hamilton County.

1929-1936 – CHILDREN’S HOME (Formerly Vine Street Orphanage)

Financial support was provided to the Children’s Home from 1929-36. Volunteers provided dancing lessons for girls there and many Active and Sustaining members served on their board.

1929-1990 – CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

The Junior League supported the hospital in many ways over the years including: Supported a two-bed ward for crippled children from 1929-1942, cost exceeding $25,000. We provided volunteers in playrooms at hospital and the salary of the first occupational therapist to be brought to Children’s Hospital from 1930-1945. In 1936 the ground was landscaped and a playground was equipped. In 1956 the “companion” room on the third floor was renovated. We purchased movie equipment in 1960 and provided holiday parties with permanent decorations, along with the redecoration and refurnishing of the playroom. Puppets were made for each patient. In 1969 volunteers redecorated and restocked the playroom. Throughout the 1970’s, until 1982, they sponsored an annual Christmas party, complete with gifts for the children and continued to provide volunteers to assist with newborn and neonatal care.

1929-1973 – ERLANGER HOSPITAL

The League established and staffed a branch of the Chattanooga Public Library at the hospital from 1929 to 1937. In 1945, support provided an expert survey of the community’s hospital facilities and needs. The League also studied the need for a new pediatric wing to be added onto the present hospital and went on record as approving the idea.

1935-1936 – SOCIAL SERVICE BUREAU

The League provided the salary of a case work supervisor from 1935-1936.

1936-1938 – THIRD DISTRICT COMMUNITY CENTER

The League helped to establish the Community Center and placed volunteers in 1936. We also helped to establish a manual training room for girls at Third District School in 1938.

1936-1941 – SANTA CLAUS CLUB

The League sponsored the club as a civic activity, distributing over 30,000 toys to needy children in 1936, and contributed annually to the Club from 1936-1941.

1936-1947 – BONNY OAKS

The Junior Garden Club was established with the help of the League in 1936, and in 1947 the League provided a two year salary for a recreational director, along with books for the library and some transportation for children.

1941 – RADIO

The League supported the programs which first began in 1941, and have supported the children’s programs and others of public interest.

1947-1948 – HAMILTON COUNTY TB ASSOCIATION

League members provided a salary for the first African-American case worker from 1947-49

1949-1963 – READING CENTER

The Junior League Reading Center was established in 1949. After investing $50,000, the JLC Center was transferred to the University of Chattanooga and the JLC Chair of Reading was established in 1943 with a $65,000 grant from the League. In 1955 the JL Center received the Betts Reading Award in recognition of outstanding service in the field of remedial reading. In 1955 the League was awarded a citation from the Hamilton County Chapter of the International Council of Reading Instruction. The University continues to use the name “Junior League” in connection with the Reading Center and has expanded services offered by the Center.